Saturday Magazine on Joy 94.9FM – US Presidential Election Analyses

trump_clinton_debate

In the days before, and in the aftermath of the bitterly contested 2016 Presidential Election between Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican nominee, and now President-elect, Donald Trump, I joined the team at Saturday Magazine on Joy 94.9FM live from Boston offering my take on the epic political battle.

In the first conversation, you can listen to my thoughts on the final weeks of the election in conversation with David “Macca” McCarthy, former Victorian State Parliamentarian Kirsty Marshall and Lord Mayor of Melbourne Robert Doyle. For all the quality of the conversation, my predictions were grossly incorrect!

You can listen to the Pre-Election conversation at Saturday Magazine >>

In the second conversation, my mood is somewhat more tempered in the aftermath of Donald Trump’s stunning victory. In reflecting on the reaction from my perspective in Boston, I converse with David “Macca” McCarthy and co-host Tass Mousaferiadis about how we can all learn from the result. If there’s one thing I’ve learned from the bitterness of the election, it is that all members of society must converse with those they disagree with, for living forever in a bubble can only lead to further divisions. Hopefully these predictions are more accurate than those I offered pre-election!

You can listen to the Post-Election conversation at Saturday Magazine >>

In the third conversation, from Los Angeles on the last day of my American travels, I discussed the transition from the Obama to the Trump Administrations and the scandals that have consumed the American political dialogue in November and December. In conversation with David “Macca” McCarthy and co-host Shannon Power, we discussed the ongoing discussion about the Russian intervention in the election and the potential legislative battles a President Trump will face in implementing his agenda.

You can listen to the Trump Transition conversation at Saturday Magazine >>

Advertisements

Teach For Australia – Stories – An Educator’s Explainer for the 2016 Election

Election_BBQ

As I venture to the kindergarten where I was educated nearly twenty years ago to cast my vote, I’ll reflect on the role education has had in my life. Moreover, I’ll take a moment to appreciate the modern marvel that is Australian democracy.

With the benefit of compulsory voting, Australia has one of the most stable and robust democracies on the face of the Earth. But it only preserves this status through an engaged citizenry; one that asks tough questions of its leaders and thinks carefully about the impact of their vote.

To achieve this, we as teachers need to play our role. No matter the result of this election it is our responsibility to engage our students in matters of politics and government and make the case for why they should get involved and vote with interest and enthusiasm.

As political commentator and Gold Logie Winner Waleed Aly said at the start of the campaign, I don’t care who you vote for, just vote, because right now we only have a partial democracy. Let’s get a real one.”

Put another way, democracy is not a spectator sport. Every election is determined by the people who show up.

You can read more at Teach For Australia >>

The University of Melbourne VOICE Magazine and The Age – Passing on a passion for teaching

IMG_3966 One of the great joys that comes from teaching is the chance to share your passions with your students. While I’ve only taught for 18 months as an Associate of Teach For Australia, I’ve already had many such moments, where my passions have been absorbed and championed by my students. You can continue reading at The University of Melbourne VOICE Magazine >> OR You can continue reading at The Age >> 2015-06-08 - VOICE Magazine - Passing on a passion for teaching-page-001

ESSA – Election 2013 – let’s talk tax reform!

Chris-Weinberg-2013.8.20-Election-2013-Let’s-Talk-Tax-Reform-480x270

As I watched ABC’s Q&A Monday episode, The National Economic Debate, I sat despairing at yet another missed opportunity to talk ambitiously about policy reforms in Australia. After an excellent question from the crowd about the merits of reforming the Goods and Services Tax (GST) to broaden its base and potentially increase the rate (whilst concurrently reducing and eliminating other inefficient and distortionary taxes), both Treasurer Chris Bowen and Shadow Treasurer Joe Hockey manoeuvered their way out of discussing what is a sensible reform. It was arguably the most disappointing element of what was a very entertaining and substantive debate between Bowen and Hockey that covered the breadth of economic issues facing Australia.

You can read more at ESSA >>

ESSA – Permanent Crises, Bitter Politics and Weak Policy – The New Reality of US Budgets

elephant-donkey-boxing-thumb-480x270

When President Barack Obama came into office in 2009, it was under a wave of optimism and hope for a more conciliatory, robust and bipartisan policymaking process between Democrats and Republicans. The country was in crisis at the time of Obama’s election, and there was the expectation that out of such a situation would come genuine compromise on both sides of the political aisle for the long-term national interest. What we observe in mid-2013 however is a policymaking process frozen from gridlock across many dimensions, none more reflective of this new confrontational reality than the development of fiscal policy.

You can read more at ESSA >>

ESSA – The Fiscal Cliff – A Done Deal, But How Good?

Fiscal-Cliff-Deal2-480x270

As I wrote back in December, everyone understood the need for a deal to be made between President Obama and Congress to avoid going over the ‘fiscal cliff.’ That is, to come to an agreement that would avert the scheduled expirations of a host of tax cuts and reductions in spending on programs like defence and social welfare benefits.

You can read more at ESSA >>

ESSA – The Fiscal Cliff – Where are we at?

Chris-Weinberg-2012.12.09-The-Fiscal-Cliff-Where-Are-We-At_-420x270

No one ever said being President of the United States was an easy job, and that has certainly been the case for the newly re-elected, President Obama. After a bitterly fought re-election over Republican nominee, Fmr. Gov. Mitt Romney, he was literally back to work the next day, beginning the negotiating to avert the Fiscal Cliff.

You can read more at ESSA >>