Saturday Magazine on Joy 94.9FM – Co-Hosting, Education, Homelessness and Journalism

On Saturday the 8th of April, I co-hosted Saturday Magazine on Joy 94.9FM with David McCarthy. Over the course of two hours we discussed a variety of issues, including the latest news in American and Australian politics, trends in education, youth homelessness and support for LGBTQ youth and the trials and tribulations of the AOC election.

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A particular highlight was to catch up with good friend and former schoolmate, Paul Millar, who’s now based in Pnomh Penh in Cambodia writing for a local magazine.

You can listen to a variety of our conversations here:

Teach For Australia – Stories – Educational Disadvantage: An Economic Perspective

This blog post is part of a series related to the SBS documentary Testing Teachers. To find out more about Testing Teachers click here.

I was born in August of 1991. Plenty was happening in the world then, much as it is now. Countries were in the throes of political crises, new technological innovations were challenging the old ways of doing things and The Simpsons were on our TV screens. Unlike now, however, in 1991 Australia was emerging from the depths of a bitter recession, dubbed by our then Prime Minister Paul Keating as one the nation ‘had to have’.

In the prevailing 26 years or so, Australia has been the economic envy of most of the developed world for our unimpeded economic growth and ability to weather events such as the Global Financial Crisis. Despite this being a source of pride for our country, and at that top of any talking points from our treasurers (starting with likes of Paul Keating and Peter Costello and continuing today with Scott Morrison), it is readily apparent that not all Australians have prospered equally. While there are many ways we can measure inequality in our society, one of the most evident means is to see the disparity, in educational opportunities for Australia’s children.

Costello and Keating

You can read more at Teach For Australia >>

Teach For Australia – Stories – An Educator’s Explainer for the 2016 Election

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As I venture to the kindergarten where I was educated nearly twenty years ago to cast my vote, I’ll reflect on the role education has had in my life. Moreover, I’ll take a moment to appreciate the modern marvel that is Australian democracy.

With the benefit of compulsory voting, Australia has one of the most stable and robust democracies on the face of the Earth. But it only preserves this status through an engaged citizenry; one that asks tough questions of its leaders and thinks carefully about the impact of their vote.

To achieve this, we as teachers need to play our role. No matter the result of this election it is our responsibility to engage our students in matters of politics and government and make the case for why they should get involved and vote with interest and enthusiasm.

As political commentator and Gold Logie Winner Waleed Aly said at the start of the campaign, I don’t care who you vote for, just vote, because right now we only have a partial democracy. Let’s get a real one.”

Put another way, democracy is not a spectator sport. Every election is determined by the people who show up.

You can read more at Teach For Australia >>

Portland Observer and Guardian – Portland’s young students play the political game

It was a great experience to again run the Year 7 Mock Election at Portland Secondary College. After the success of the initiative in 2014, the school collaborated to run the program again with a more rigorous approach to teaching the students about civics and citizenship.

Sincere thanks to Dan Tehan MP for Wannon and Federal Speaker Tony Smith MP for Casey for attending the Election Day events and congratulations to the 7B Greens for winning the contest!

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Portland Observer and Guardian – Secondary school students ask tough questions of Tehan

Following on the from the success of welcoming former Premier Denis Napthine MP to Portland Secondary College in 2014, Dan Tehan MP for Wannon was invited to participate in a forum with the Senior Student Leadership Team and members of the Student Representative Council at PSC in August of 2015.

The Portland Observer and Guardian noted the substance of the students questions and praised their interest in connecting with their political leaders.

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The University of Melbourne VOICE Magazine and The Age – Passing on a passion for teaching

IMG_3966 One of the great joys that comes from teaching is the chance to share your passions with your students. While I’ve only taught for 18 months as an Associate of Teach For Australia, I’ve already had many such moments, where my passions have been absorbed and championed by my students. You can continue reading at The University of Melbourne VOICE Magazine >> OR You can continue reading at The Age >> 2015-06-08 - VOICE Magazine - Passing on a passion for teaching-page-001